Jim Green Jr. - Coffee with Jim and James episode 170

Episode 170 February 12, 2024 00:21:03
Jim Green Jr. - Coffee with Jim and James episode 170
Coffee With Jim & James
Jim Green Jr. - Coffee with Jim and James episode 170

Feb 12 2024 | 00:21:03

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Hosted By

James Cross Jim Schauer

Show Notes

In this heartwarming episode of Coffee with Jim and James, we delve into the profound question of legacy with industry stalwart Jim Green. 

Jim is the general manager of the Scottsboro Water Sewer Gas Board and the current president of the Alabama Natural Gas Association.

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Episode Transcript

[00:00:00] Speaker A: Java. [00:00:24] Speaker B: Yeah. This is our first virtual of 2024, but it's also the first one we've done virtually maybe on Riverside at all. [00:00:36] Speaker C: I think we might have done one before, I think. And as I hesitate, I look outside, I know you guys are all dealing with a polar vortex. I literally have a hurricane coming down right now. [00:00:47] Speaker B: Really? [00:00:48] Speaker A: Oh, it's crazy. [00:00:50] Speaker C: It's raining sideways, but we should be good. [00:00:52] Speaker B: Speaking of, I think, what is it here in Texas? Well, Jimmy, you go first. I'm going to look mine up. I know it's cold here. [00:01:00] Speaker A: This morning when I woke up was 13 degrees. [00:01:03] Speaker B: 13 right now. [00:01:06] Speaker A: Freezer, north Alabama. [00:01:08] Speaker B: Yeah, it's a balmy 24 degrees right now. Feels like 15. And this is the hottest day we've had in a week, it feels like. And you know what's great is the natural gas is still pumping, Jimmy. [00:01:22] Speaker A: That's right. We're doing what we do best. [00:01:25] Speaker C: Thank goodness. Keeping people warm, even here in Florida. Recently, we had some temperatures that dipped down into the. People were running their natural gas heaters with pride and pleasure. I won't tell you. It's today, 82 here. [00:01:41] Speaker B: I'm not going to tell you what happens. You know what happens when it gets that cold in Florida, don't you, Jimmy? Either one of you all know what happens, don't you? Tell them. [00:01:49] Speaker C: Tell them. Iguanas fall out of the trees. [00:01:52] Speaker A: Oh, yes, I've heard that. Do you run around and pick them up? No. [00:01:57] Speaker C: I had a friend, though, that told me that years back, he got one, picked it up, threw it in his trunk, thought it was dead, was just going to get rid of it, woke back up, thawed out, and was, like, tearing in the back of his trunk. So, no, you do not want to pick up iguanas. When they fall from the trees, they will naturally come back. [00:02:17] Speaker B: I do have a new food truck idea, though, just certain times of the year in Florida. For those that don't know you. Jim Green. Mr. Jimmy Green. There might be some folks out of there that maybe don't live in Alabama. They've never heard of you, sir, but I got the pleasure of meeting you this past year, I think, at APGA first. [00:02:39] Speaker A: That's right. [00:02:39] Speaker B: And then again in Alabama later in the year. Do us a favor and introduce yourself, if you don't mind. [00:02:45] Speaker A: Yes, sir. I'm Jim Green. I'm the current general manager of the Scottsborough Water, sewer and gas board. I am the acting president, current president of the Alabama Natural Gas association. I've been with Scottsborough about 31 years. I've been in the business about 31 years, so that's pretty much me. [00:03:08] Speaker C: Yeah, you got a little bit of history to you. One thing that James and I love to do and is hear about origin stories. And real briefly, like mine began with my great grandfather, red shower in the oil patch in Oklahoma in the 1920s. And from there on, we're now five generations in. Jim, do you have a little bit of an origin story about yourself? I mean, 31 years. You got to have something in there that's going to kind of be interesting. [00:03:36] Speaker A: It's actually longer than 31 years. My dad was on the board of directors for the utility company, and my grandfather was public service inspector, public service commission inspector for the state of Alabama. So it came to me kind of early. I would go to the Alabama Natural Gas association meetings at about seven, and then my grandfather took me on the road when I was about 13. I learned how to fuse pipe together when I was about 13 years old. And from then on, it was just in my blood. And I've been doing it, like I said, for 31 years. Couldn't think of doing anything different, wouldn't do anything different. Love it, enjoy it, hope to pass it along to somebody that enjoys it as much as I do and pass this heritage along. It's a great story. [00:04:36] Speaker B: It is a great story. And I know when we were in Alabama in December at the know Alabama PSC event, you spoke about the heritage of this industry and just how important it was to Alabama and to you personally and for so many people in that room. And I know, as you mentioned when we came on about being the president, this coming year's president of AnGA, and that's got to be something special for you. You're talking about heritage and your lineage there, but how does that weave into your vision and that bigger message for Anga this year? [00:05:20] Speaker A: Well, so to back up just a little bit, you got to remember, when I first saw Anga, I was little, blonde headed, blue eyed young man who had dreams and ambitions of someday doing exactly what I'm doing. And that's become the president of the Alabama Natural Gas association, which is a great honor to me. It's been a great privilege to work with guys such as yourself all over the state, all over the country. We've had some great relationships, and so it's been a real honor. How does that weave into my heritage? When I was looking for a theme for the year, all I could think about is, I've been doing this for so long, and I've seen it grow in so many positive ways and want to see it grow, continue to grow in a positive way. This industry has been so good, and I think it gets a bad light from some of our kids who don't really understand it. And so I'm hoping to take that heritage, weave and weave it not only into the organization itself, but back into the kids of Alabama. We actually have some literature that we're working on right now to put in the schools of Alabama so that they kind of know we're not the big, bad boogeyman. We're actually today, we're what keeps you warm in your house today in 13 degree weather in Alabama. We're what keeps you nice and toasty. What does? Jobs in Alabama. We couldn't do it in Alabama without natural gas and the people of this organization and their lineage and their heritage and the things they've done in the past and the things they'll do in the future, but it all meshes together, and it's a great group of people. I believe I told the story down there in Montgomery about my grandfather told me, he said, this is before cell phones. Now, you got to remember that. Cell phones and Internet and all that. He said, if you ever get in trouble anywhere in Alabama, go to the nearest gas company. Tell them who you are, what your granddad does, and what you need, and I guarantee you those people will help you out. It is true. It's true today. I think if I went in, even your part of the world and told them what I did, amen, that they'd say, come on in. How can I help you? It's a great business to be in. I can't imagine being in any other business. And I know there's good ones out there. I know they've all got their perks and all that, but I just can't imagine being in anything but the natural gas industry in a business that takes care of its own people. [00:08:06] Speaker C: And I agree with you, too, James. You and I talk about this a lot, and you actually lived at this last week on a personal time when you noticed that a pipeline marker was down. And you could have easily, just like any of us, driven by it and not even said anything. But James stopped, went back, found out who the marker belonged to, gave him a call, and all of a sudden, he had a storm of people saying, thank you. Thank you for letting us know. We owe you one. We're going to get out there and replace it. We want safety first. Again, it's just kind of a little side note example. That's still happening today. But I do want to know. [00:08:40] Speaker A: Yeah. How many times did you have to. [00:08:42] Speaker C: Go to a gas company in Alabama when you're growing up and knock on the door and say, hey, I could use a hand? Come on. [00:08:47] Speaker A: I don't tell all the stories now. You know, I'd like to have a podcast like y'all and tell stories, but some of those might get me in trouble. I'll say there's some great guys in Alabama that keep great secrets when a young man needs some help. How about that? [00:09:05] Speaker B: Amen. I like that. [00:09:06] Speaker A: Fair enough. [00:09:07] Speaker B: Jiminy, I did want to ask you a question, and it ties in well, because, well, it's a two parter. One is one of the stories you told us when we were there, and I believe it was your grandfather, but you said you would drive around with them, or maybe it was your dad, and you said if you all got done early, you could go fishing. Is there validity to that? [00:09:29] Speaker A: Absolutely is. His times are different. You can't do the things that we used to do in the past. But part of the summer is I would get in the car with him and he would go from city to city inspecting them, and he would tell me, he said, son, if you'll be good during this inspection, we'll go fishing in the afternoon. [00:09:53] Speaker B: Amen. [00:09:53] Speaker A: So we get done with our inspected and we go sometimes with people in that community that he'd learned over the years of being in that community. We'd go fishing with them, or we'd go fishing with just whoever. But it was a great time as a young man growing up to be able to go and see people all over the state. And I still have friends, of course, some of them are getting older now, and some of them are moving on to the great man in the sky. But it's been a real pleasure over the years meeting and enjoying their company. And I have lifelong friends because of. Absolutely, yeah. [00:10:39] Speaker B: Not all of us got to sit in the floorboard, allegedly, of our family members car and get indoctrinate into the industry the way you did. But there is a lot of people we are trying to reach and talk to that are from newer generations or know, have different views or have not even witnessed or been a part of our industry in any way. And my question to you, Jim, and I guess I don't want to say it's a challenge, but it is a challenge for our industry right now, is how does heritage relate to them? And how can they feel like they're seen in that message as good? [00:11:21] Speaker A: That's a great question, James. And I've got some really young people that work with me here locally, and I've worked with across the state that have some of the grandest ideas to move forward in this industry that I have ever seen. It's not us old guys that come up with the great ideas or the technology to make these things work. I'm sitting here watching monitors and stuff today because of some of these younger generation that have the ideas that we need to use and make work because they are very smart, very smart. Smarter than I ever was. Now, there's a difference. Okay. I'm not going to sit here and say that I agree with all of the young generation, sure, but they are very smart. They have some great ideas. And I think from an heritage standpoint, they are trying to make their own heritage in this system. And I hope that as an organization, I hope as my own organization, we give them the opportunity to dream and think and put things together. Because I believe through the years, I've been able to be able to dream and think and put my own mark on this great industry that we work in. And I hope I can pass that on to somebody else where they can do the same thing. They can dream and put their ideas into this organization, into this industry, and come up with things that are truly innovative and wonderful for our business, for our industry, for safety, for compliance, all kinds. I've got compliance people, one of which sitting across the hall over here. She's new into the industry, but I'll tell you, she's done one of the best jobs, very young, very smart, and does fantastic work in our industry. And so, hey, I'm proud of these young people. I'm proud of what they're doing. Yeah. [00:13:26] Speaker C: And James and I talk about this. We actually give a keynote address on something very similar about the generations and the new generations coming in. And James and I are passionate about mentorship. And as I like to say, all the mistakes I made, I want the next generation not to make those. So I need to help share what I learned over the years, but at the same time, also learning from them. They have a lot know. Like you were commenting, jimmy, commenting, there's so much that we can learn from them. And if we marry that experience with this new technology and thought process, some great things can and will occur. It's an exciting time for us. [00:14:04] Speaker B: I would just say, being from the younger generation myself, Jimmy's, I can just say I appreciate all of. Just kidding. [00:14:15] Speaker C: Did you say younger generation? [00:14:17] Speaker B: It mixes in a little bit more. I don't know. [00:14:22] Speaker A: Mine don't mix in too much anymore. Mine's just turned all white and loose. It's turned loose as well. [00:14:29] Speaker B: I keep a hat on. Look at that knowledge. Each one of those is knowledge sharing. [00:14:37] Speaker C: I could tell you a story that I've had since I've been 18. That was actually frostbite when I was 14 years old. So that's always been white right there. But the rest of it is coming with. Ready for this seasoned experience? [00:14:50] Speaker A: That's right. I like seasoned experience. [00:14:56] Speaker B: Well, Jim, we have a surprise. Well, we hoped it'd be a different kind of surprise, but we did the next best thing. So we were talking about this episode with our wonderful boss, Mr. Jeff Isabel, and he said, oh, you're going to get on there with know I've got some things I want to ask. You know, you talked about the level of confidence you had and everybody keeping your. Well, Jeff. Jeff reached out. No, I'm just kidding. But he did send us a question. He did want to be here. He was booked. But he did send us a question. I think Jim's going to ask it. [00:15:38] Speaker C: Yeah, I'd be my pleasure. And I'm actually going to read it verbatim just because it's in the Jeff speak. [00:15:45] Speaker A: Yeah. [00:15:45] Speaker C: You know what I'm saying? So it's great. So, Jimmy, reflecting on the impact of both personal achievements and personal relationships that you've built and nurtured throughout your life, what will matter most to you in the long run as it relates to the legacy you want to leave behind? [00:16:03] Speaker A: Well, Jeff is a perfect example of that. Jeff and I had melanoma at the same time. I don't know if he wants me to tell that or not. I'm going to tell it anyway. [00:16:14] Speaker B: Good. [00:16:14] Speaker A: And we had cancer at the same time. And his support, and hopefully my support to him is a legacy throughout this organization. I find it to be wonderful to be able to reach out to people in this organization and outside these walls. Hope when I'm done with this organization and retire and move on to a different direction, I hope that they say Jim was one of those people. If you reached out to him and asked him for something or asked him to help you or just asked him for anything, he always tried to help you or tried to work for it or told you a direction you go in to help you out, I hope I can leave that kind of legacy. I hope I've been that kind of person to several people in this industry. That's how it was given to me. I hope I pass it along in the same manner that it was given to me. [00:17:16] Speaker B: Mike Trapp. [00:17:18] Speaker C: Mike Trapp is, you know, we had talked about doing another final question, and actually, Jimmy just answered the question that we wanted to answer for him as know legacy. And what do you want to leave behind, and what do you want to leave behind for the natural gas industry? And you actually answered it beautifully. Kudos, sir. [00:17:37] Speaker A: Kudos. [00:17:38] Speaker B: Absolutely. Well, Jimmy, you're a fine example of this industry. I do appreciate the work you do in Alabama. I get the privilege of spending some time there throughout the year, and everybody's the salt of the earth. But you are a great example of that, and especially your team. I know that I had to go look it up. I knew it was a long time. But I called on Stephanie Hubbard, and she said they've been a client for 17 and a half years over at Scottsboro. So we appreciate that as well. That says a lot about our relationship that I don't have a lot of 17 and a half year old friendships, and that probably says something about me. But seriously, it's a pleasure to do business together and work with your team. [00:18:28] Speaker A: It's been a great relationship. You all have worked with us over the years as changes come in this industry, Oqt, whatever, y'all been right on top of it. Y'all have helped us along the way, get through some bumpy roads, changes, and rules, and those kind of things. Jeff has been very instrumental in those things as well. I can't say anything but positives for you all and your company. I enjoy this. This is a techno thing. I am a little bit of a. Even though I'm gray, I'm a little bit of a techno geek, and I love these technology things that you all do. I think it helps get that younger generation to see what we do. They can click on a video. I'm a youtuber at night. I love to watch YouTube videos. [00:19:22] Speaker B: We won't tell anybody. We won't tell anybody. [00:19:25] Speaker A: If you get these things out, I think it helps kind of get our industry meshed a little more. And so I really appreciate you guys. I appreciate the work that do. It's always fun to be around you. Sometimes I'm a little camera shy, but for the most part, I enjoy. [00:19:48] Speaker C: I'm camera shy also. [00:19:50] Speaker B: Y'all are something else. Well, listen, Jim, we appreciate you, appreciate the work you're doing over in Anga, as well, keeping us safe. And I know everybody in Alabama appreciate you this morning when they woke up. [00:20:08] Speaker C: Any last words before we sign off, Jimmy? Any words of recommendation, words to leave folks with. [00:20:15] Speaker A: No, just get up and enjoy every day. [00:20:18] Speaker C: Amen. [00:20:20] Speaker A: And you ought to enjoy every day. And if you're not doing that, then you're not doing what you should be doing. You get blessed to get up. Just enjoy it. Talk to somebody. Enjoy a friendship. Enjoy a relationship. Have some positive over the day. [00:20:37] Speaker B: Listen to a podcast. [00:20:40] Speaker C: And with that, there's no better way to end this episode of Cock with Jim and James and those words. Kudos, Eric. Kudos deep.

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